NoSQL and MySQL notes

NoSQL: If Only It Was That Easy at Marked As Pertinent

What am I going to build my next app on? Probably Postgres. Will I use NoSQL? Maybe. I might also use Hadoop and Hive. I might keep everything in flat files. Maybe I’ll start hacking on Maglev. I’ll use whatever is best for the job. If I need reporting, I won’t be using any NoSQL. If I need caching, I’ll probably use Tokyo Tyrant. If I need ACIDity, I won’t use NoSQL. If I need a ton of counters, I’ll use Redis. If I need transactions, I’ll use Postgres. If I have a ton of a single type of documents, I’ll probably use Mongo. If I need to write 1 billion objects a day, I’d probably use Voldemort. If I need full text search, I’d probably use Solr. If I need full text search of volatile data, I’d probably use Sphinx.

Which is faster: MySQL or MongoDB? Does it depend on the use case? – Quora

To me, the Mysql vs MongoDB benchmarks are revealing as they show that with beefy hardware, a NoSQL engine does not have to be faster than a well indexed Mysql Table, which might seem the case.

 

MySQL became the most popular relational database on the planet by turning its weaknesses into strengths and successfully leveraging its ubiquity.

 

It would be foolish to predict the same success that MySQL enjoyed for MongoDB, because the underlying market context has changed.